Whether you are newlyweds, or you’ve been together for decades, money and how it’s handled can often play an important role in your overall happiness and satisfaction in the relationship. But when there’s income inequality brought into the picture, couples can experience an unexpected strain on their partnership.

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Life can be expensive. This is just a simple fact when you add up all your monthly expenses versus your income. Your biggest expenses are obviously going to be your rent or mortgage, car payment, insurance, utilities, and grocery bills. You may even have student loans you are still paying off. That doesn’t even include all the fun stuff you want in life like that daily coffee run or a new pair of shoes. When you are living on a single income it can be easy to let your wants and needs eclipse what you are making at your job salary-wise.

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Life can be expensive. This is just a simple fact when you add up all your monthly expenses versus your income. Your biggest expenses are obviously going to be your rent or mortgage, car payment, insurance, utilities, and grocery bills. You may even have student loans you are still paying off. That doesn’t even include all the fun stuff you want in life like that daily coffee run or a new pair of shoes. When you are living on a single income it can be easy to let your wants and needs eclipse what you are making at your job salary-wise.

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As mothers, sisters and daughters, women are often counted on to be caregivers for family members in need. Whether it’s something as small as a cold or as debilitating as a terminal illness, women are typically the ones to care for and help out when a loved one is sick. But what happens when the caregiver is in need of her own care?

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Are you a part of the sandwich generation? Not sure what that even means? The sandwich generation is defined as people usually in their 30s, 40s, and 50s who have children to take care of but also hold the responsibility of looking after their aging parents as well. It’s a complicated situation to be in. To qualify to be a part of the sandwich generation, you need to have a parent older than 65 and children younger than 18-years-old.

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There’s no question that finances are complex enough as it is. Add a new marriage to the mix, and things can get a bit hairy. According to Winning Stepfamilies, approximately 65 percent of new marriages in the U.S. involve children.1 And as we all know, children can add a substantial financial responsibility to our plates. If not handled strategically, managing bills with both your new partner and your ex-partner can create a tangled web that can impact children. And oftentimes, there’s more than one set involved. The U.S. Census Bureau found that about 70 percent of remarried couples have children.2

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Lifestyle creep is something that’s simple to define, easy to see, yet hard to avoid. Especially prevalent amongst young professionals, lifestyle creep is a hurdle many face in saving for their short- and long-term goals, like retirement. Below we’ll discuss what exactly lifestyle creep is and four ways you can work to avoid it.

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As we get older, more and more expenses end up on our plate. From mortgages to car repairs, it can feel like there are endless bills to pay. And as we all know, with more bills, comes more pressure, anxiety and stress. In fact, the American Psychological Association found that money is Americans’ number one stressor. Finances have remained at the top of the list since the survey began in 2007.

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No matter how often people are told to build up an emergency fund for themselves, it’s not always easy to take the necessary steps when you feel as though you’re living from paycheck to paycheck. But unfortunately, these emergencies are often what land you in a cycle of borrowing that can ultimately damage a credit score. For an easier time, keep the following advice in mind before you start setting money aside. 

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Losing your job can be a devastating turn of events. You may have felt it coming or maybe you were totally blindsided by layoffs or cutbacks that you had zero control over. At the time you are let go, you may feel a bit of panic coming on (or a lot of panic!) about what to do regarding your finances.

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When you want to stash away some of your money, it’s likely you’ll turn to the account options provided by local banks and credit unions. While it’s common to open a checking and savings account for easy access to your cash, it’s important to consider all of your options – including money market accounts (MMA). Below we’ll outline what your options are and the important considerations to make as you decide which is right for you.

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Spending can quickly get out of hand if you don’t have a budget and you have the “I want” syndrome. You start with good intentions, but before you know it, you’ve spent money that was earmarked for saving, or something else. What happened? In order to get to the root of the problem and address overspending issues, there are a few things you must do.

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Developing good money habits in your early adult years can help you position yourself for financial stability and better grow your wealth over time. The sad truth is that many young adults in their 20’s are unaware of how to best manage their money and will often regret the monetary decisions they made in their 20’s well into their 30’s and 40’s. For 20-year-olds looking to get into good money habits early, below are four things you should know.

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Once your last paycheck has been deposited, you’re essentially on your own when it comes to creating a steady income throughout retirement. That’s where retirement withdrawal strategies can come into play. Spending your savings without the checks and balances of a proper plan in place could leave you in a situation many retirees dread. In fact, 37 percent of today’s retirees are most afraid of running out of savings in retirement, while 23 percent fear they won’t be able to meet the basic financial needs of their family.

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We won’t sugar coat it — achieving your financial goals isn’t always easy. But if you don’t create a plan based on your goals, you’re only making it harder on yourself. In fact, American’s with a plan in place are more likely to make positive progress towards achieving their financial goals. In a recent survey, 56 percent of people with a plan in place reported making good or excellent progress towards their savings needs, compared to only 24 percent of those who didn’t.1 As you look to find financial well-being, we’re offering six steps you can follow in creating achievable financial goals.

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